Free Java Games – Entertain Yourself in Your Leisure Time

Today, you can find cell phones having multifunctional organisational tools. Apart from meeting your communication needs, it can also be used for the entertainment purpose. You can entertain yourself with free java games which are available with most of the latest handsets. Java games have great functionality and it is based on a very skinny programming language. The java games have different categories like action, racing, sports, puzzles etc.

In the category of action games, you can enjoy Ghost Force, Alien Unleashed, Predator and conflict Vietnam. Though, these action games will look good in the flat-screen games-enhanced system at your home. However, you can find many functions like AI and full missions, which will help you to enjoy with your handset as well.

As far as online Mobile Java Games are concerned, then the games like Badaz Poker and Blackjack are the good options in this category. You can play these games offline or online. In addition to this, you can even engage in the tournament play and can chat with your opponents as well.

If you have a dream to beat Lance Armstrong, then you can do it on your own armchair itself. With the games like Extreme Motorbike and Tour de France, you can race around the track or the course while standing still.

If you are willing to play sports games, then Smash and Ace (a tennis game) are the options which you can play with. If you would like to play a little violent game then you can go with kickboxing. On the other hand, if fishing is your hobby then try the Shark Hunt.
Java games on cell phones are considered to be a new trend and we can expect some more java games with some more functions in the near future.

Mobile Gaming Made More Desirable With Near Field Communication Technology

Prior to the millennium, gaming took a back seat as mobile devices were still crude in their hardware design and software updates. But with the Smartphones, when the User Interface was given ambience to feel the gaming world became serious business. The software developers soon started to explore the fun side of the technology by developing games that would get so addictive when once tried. However, top companies like Microsoft, Nokia and other big players are now looking at incorporating Near Field Communication technology into games to launch some exciting ‘tangible’ games that would interact with the real world objects.

As I read through the Microsoft’s blog, there was a hypothetical post on how a restaurant can use NFC to keep their clients’ kids occupied at their table! The waitress distributes tiny devices that represent the characters from a popular children’s movie. On playing the games provided by the restaurant the game pieces react to the phone and triggers interactive elements like displaying puzzles, animations and videos. It sounds exciting, isn’t it? That is not all, upon successfully completing the puzzle for instance; the phone shall receive a bonus! What is that? Well, it could be a discount coupon or free tickets to a special screening of a movie! This strategy at restaurants not will keep the children and parents happy but will leave them an everlasting memory along with them. There is a high probability that these customers would turn loyal customers of the restaurant. The owner might be quiet sure of them visiting his restaurant or eat out joint again.

NFC is incorporated not only as a payment mode but also as an advertising mode. Being entertained is just another feather in the NFC’s cap. Pepsi though is a well know brand, uses mobile gaming as a campaign to promote its Brisk iced tea and juice drinks. The carbonated soft drink maker has chosen the Star Wars episode characters Yoda and Darth Maul in its mobile game to promote Brisk iced tea which is the product of the Pepsi Lipton Partnership as it targets the male audience in the age group of 18 to 29.

Now are you wondering why companies are looking at the mobile gaming to boost their sales and promotional activities? Have a look at the stats below.

In the mobile app world, downloading games is done more intensively than any other functional apps. It is also found that around 93% of the crowd is willing to pay for the mobile game apps. When compared to other entertainment apps like weather forecast or news apps, the games rule the download surveys. Thus, as Microsoft predicts the gaming industry coupled with commercial NFC technologies can me the best medium for promotion of products or services with minimal cost investments.

The game developing companies like Rovio is all set to launch the Angry Birds game as the Magic version. I am sure whether a mobile gaming enthusiast or not we all want to experience Magic! So if you are a mobile game developer a lucrative career in this field awaits for you or perhaps you are already earning your mulah.

Mobile Gaming – A Corporate Curse or Consumer Gift?

Since the iPhone was launched and the App store was released upon the world, we’ve seen thousands upon thousands of new apps and games flood the market from creative individuals and developers. This made mobile gaming a true platform to be enjoyed by literally everyone with access to a Smartphone, iPod touch or other compatible device. Specifically I’m talking mobiles/Smartphones/Tablets and not PS Vita or Nintendo DS/3DS.

From the age old classic of ‘Snake’ a decade or so ago in black and white, where having any game on your phone was a novelty in even the most basic of forms, to now almost PlayStation 2 level graphical quality with games such as N.O.V.A or Real Racing series by EA – mobile gaming has come a very long way indeed. Making calls and shooting zombies all on the same device has never been so rewarding or time consuming. From a good business standpoint it’s opened up the gaming market to the widest audience possible – a recent report found that 79% of 18-44 year olds have their Smartphones near them 22 hours a day. Giving consumers something fun to do while they are waiting or commuting whilst being engaged with a brand/mobile advertising is the best of both worlds one may think, but can this be destructive?

Games come in many varieties. Free, paid for or a disconcerting mixture called ‘Freemium’. Free games are generally supported by advertising (as are Freemium) whereas paid games generally speaking contain few or no advertisements. The paid or free games I take no issue with. Freemium however are cleverly disguised as ‘Free’ but soon either halt your game progress or constantly bombard you with slightly misleading options which make you unsure whether you have to pay or not. The aim is to get you so hooked with an addictive business model that you feel enamoured to spend money to continue. Granted, the issues arising from this are aimed at the younger audiences entering their Apple id and not realising there is a charge yet it’s an unsavoury practice. It’s much like a game demo but a very restrictive one that is rarely representative of a decent gaming experience. As a result this has caused untold grief for many people mistakenly making payments which were unclear and generally creating a bad taste in consumer’s mouth.

There is a fear in my mind that a Smartphone culture has made us all both less aware of what is going on around us, but also turning our brains on autopilot to an extent. On the train this morning out of 6 seats (split into 2 sets of 3 facing each other) every single person was deep into their Smartphone swiping and tapping. We’re in a digital age so naturally assume this to be pretty normal and there is almost a stigma attached to you if you don’t have a Smartphone, however I can’t help feeling a little jaded that most would spend all day with screens in offices and the natural instinct is to look at another screen on the way home. People miss train stops, lose track of time or even have been close to having an accident walking across the road due to playing on their Smartphone. Make no mistake, Smartphones will only get more advanced and more time sappingly engaging addictive games will arrive

Largely due to the complexity of mobile games we can now tweet, share and socially integrate ourselves with our digital counterparts. Perhaps cynically it’s a way to boost brands’ digital footprint under the guise of competing with your friends for a high score. In previous times the computer opponent was the only top score that mattered and now you’re up against the world – a daunting task if ever there was one, but empowering nonetheless.

Shady DLC practices and social monitoring aside, mobile gaming will simply continue to drain both time and money from many consumers but ultimately levitating any notion of boredom that ever existed when your train breaks down, your girlfriend is late or you’ve had that dodgy Indian curry and are ‘otherwise engaged’.